Alghero


Alghero 

Alghero is a Sardinian city with a clear Catalonian influence. It underwent Spanish colonisation for a lengthy period of time which left its mark on the town’s architecture, traditions, its typical cuisine like the famous “aragosta alla catalana” (Catalonian-style Lobster) and above all on the local language, to such an extent that the people of Alghero have a strong sense of belonging to the culture of their motherland 
The historic centre is found within the old fortified village and tourism, together with craftwork, in particular the working of coral, is the main driving force of the little town’s economy. The town’s architecture, with so many Catalonian-style features, ensures that it is the perfect destination for the visitor who is interested in seeking a sense of refinement and detail in the buildings. 

Starting from the “Esperò Real” Tower you can take a stroll by the sea, which as evening draws on becomes a pleasant and busy place to be. Starting from the south, after the Dante promenade you come across the Cristoforo Colombo and Marco Polo seafronts, where a number of ancient fortresses stand and which take you all the way to the port. Not far from the flight of steps taking you to the old “Porta a Mare”, the imposing bulk of the “Forte de La Magdalena” rises, a remarkable fortification from the Spanish period with a plaque on its walls recalling Garibaldi’s landing here on 14 August 1855. 

The portal of the Cathedral of Alghero opens onto the little Piazzetta Duomo. It was built in the XIV century and took on its present appearance halfway through the sixteenth century. The architectural style is late –Gothic, of Catalonian inspiration and the structure is surmounted by an octagonal bell-tower from the same period. Inside, one can note a tangible difference between the structure of the central body (late Renaissance) and the shape of the sixteenth century Gothic presbytery. However, it is perhaps the Church of San Francesco which represents the most noteworthy Catalonian monument in the whole of Sardinia. Built at the end of the fourteenth century and then partially reconstructed after part of it collapsed at the beginning of the seventeenth century, the church shows all the different building phases: the dome, covered with polychromatic tiles, has become the symbol of the town; on the inside its nave and two aisles are in white sandstone and it still houses several wooden altars from the Baroque period and an eighteenth century altar stands under the Gothic studded ceiling of the presbytery. In summer the cloister becomes the scene for concerts and cultural events.  



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